Postdocs

Participants:

 
Jemima Akinsanya

Jemima Akinsanya
NIH

I am originally from Nigeria and grew up in New Jersey. I completed Neurology Residency at Emory University June 2020. Currently I am a clinical neuroimmunology fellow at the NIH in my second year of fellowship. My primary research goal during my fellowship is to conduct clinical trials to study neuroinflammatory diseases. My focus is on therapeutics for multiple sclerosis (MS) and Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). I also have a strong interest in health disparities research which I am currently conducting through collaboration with the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council (NANDSC) Working Group for Health Disparities and Inequities in Neurological Disorder. Following my fellowship, I plan to continue my research career as an academic neuroimmunologist with a focus on health disparities research.

 
Carlos Cardenas-Iniguez

Carlos Cardenas-Iniguez
Keck School of Medicine (USC)

Carlos Cardenas-Iniguez (pronouns he/him/his) is currently a postdoctoral scholar in the Herting Neuroimaging Laboratory in the Department of Population and Public Health Sciences at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. He earned his PhD in Psychology and Integrative Neuroscience from the University of Chicago in 2019. His research focuses on exploring the impact of social stratification (i.e. political, structural, and social determinants of health) on the environments in which people live, and how these environments, in turn, impact neural and cognitive development and mental health using neuroimaging methods (structural, functional, and diffusion MRI, EEG), self-report, and psychological testing paradigms. His research interests also include the implementation of spatial analysis, Public Health Critical Race Praxis, and anti-racism principles in neuroscience/psychology research.

 
Timothy Hines

Timothy Hines
Jackson Labs

I have had an interest in neuroscience and neurological disease for as long as I can remember. I graduated from Appalachian State University in 2012 with a B.A. and B.S. in Psychology and minors in German and Chemistry. I then attended the University of South Carolina for graduate school where I worked in the lab of Dr. Deanna Smith studying the regulation of dynein-dependent axonal transport. After completing my Ph.D. in 2018, I joined the lab of Dr. Rob Burgess at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, where I am studying the cellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying forms of inherited peripheral neuropathy associated with dominant mutations in tRNA synthetases. In the future, I hope to run my own lab group using my knowledge of axon biology to better understand disease mechanisms so that more effective therapeutics can be designed.

Dan Landayan

Dan Landayan
Stanford University

My father and mother emigrated from the Philippines to California. I became the first person in my family to get into college. During my undergraduate, my favorite course was introductory psychology. It was here I learned of Sigmund Freud’s theory of the mind and the underlying principles he established to explain human behavior. I was also intrigued by his paradigm of the mind as a black box:  first, a stimulus enters the “black box.” Second, something mysterious and unexplainable occurs within the black box. Then finally, a behavior is measured. From this point on, I was obsessed with the inner machinations of the nervous system. For my graduate work, I focused on understanding how the brain encodes motivated behaviors to satisfy thirst and hunger using the fruit fly model. As a post-doctoral scholar, I want to translate my fly expertise to the study of how motivated social behaviors are encoded in the mammalian brain. In the longer term I would like to explore the circuit interactions that modulate different innate behaviors.

Rose

Deborah Rose
Duke University Medical Center

I am a Neurology Resident at Duke University Medical Center. I am a first-generation Jamaican-American and was born and raised in New Jersey. I completed my undergraduate education at Cornell University in 2015, a gap year of research at the National Institutes of Health and the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Human Genetic Research (2015-2016), and medical school at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in 2020. Following residency at Duke, I plan to pursue a fellowship in Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry. Currently, my research is exploring ways to optimize diagnostic screening modalities for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as well as examining the biopsychosocial and epigenetic mechanisms underlying racial disparities in the development of mild cognitive impairment and AD. I have a particular interest in studying the role that adverse childhood experiences and chronic toxic stress may play in the pathogenesis of AD and contribute to the racial disparities seen in the condition.